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Technology

  • Iphone 5 Breakdown and Take-Apart Video

    Break it down! iPhone 5

    We here at http://www.fix-iphones.com know that everyone has been itching to get their hands on the iPhone 5.  And the thing we like to do most as soon as we get one is to take it apart! Our favorite part of the whole process is to break it down, and see what makes the little guy run.  We love to see all of those shiny guts and innards of this machine, and here is what we found.

    iPhone 5 Take Apart Video

     

    In this iPhone 5 Breakdown video, you will see that the LCD digitizer and glass are all actually one piece now. This makes for much faster and easier repairs. Is Apple trying to take it easy on itself for its one-year, under-warranty fixes? Or, alternatively, could this be an extremely elegant design solution for a new and totally redesigned phone? Can’t it be both?

    The other major feature of note? This iPhone 5 breakdown video shows that the vibrate motor has returned yet again to the old faithful model of the iPhone 3G and 4, abandoning the design and specs of the motor from the iPhone 4S.  Just as we predicted in previous posts, Apple is reviving a lot of the earlier design choices from the iPhone 3G models.  And we’re ok with that. We think that the design choices, given the limited space available with the larger battery requirements (to work on LTE) these were pretty smart solutions. Indeed, why did they change them in the first place? It’s almost as though the Apple iPhone was evolving in one direction (that of the 4S) and decided to backtrack and relive successes of previous iterations.

    So there’s your first look at an iPhone 5 breakdown. We hope you enjoyed seeing all of the fancy new bits and bobs just as much as we did.  What’s your favorite part of the redesign? Let us know in the comments.

    Curtis Taylor

    Curtis is a tech expert and go to guy for fix-iphones.com.

    Google+

  • Apple Headphone Jack EXCLUSIVE Parts Photo: could it be an iPad Mini Part Leak?

    The sources at Fix-iPhones.com have once again provided the techs at RepairLabs with exclusive photos.  We believe that these photos are genuine headphone jack components from the much-anticipated iPad Mini, rumored to be released this September.

    In contrast to previously released parts photos from Nowhereelse.fr and iResq.com, we think these photos are more likely to be the real deal.

     

    Supporting Evidence for Genuine iPad Mini Part:

    iPad Mini Headphone Jack Photo Leak

    Picture 1, Leaked Headphone Jack Images

    Picture 1 (Leaked Headphone Jack Images)

    • Very similar to iPad 3 headphone jack
    • It’s short and stumpy: would take up less real estate in iPad mini
    • Black, not gold—black is the standard Apple color of parts
    • This is a complete part ready for assembly into device
    • Standard Apple barcode visible on back
    • Exact yellow adhesive as used in previous iPad parts
    • Many similarities to iPad 3 (see below.)

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Leaked Photo’s Similarities to iPad 3 Headphone Jack

    iPad 3 headphone Jack

    iPad 3 Headphone Jack, front and back views

    • Both have slide flex cables that connect the logic board
    • The headphone jack makeup is very similar
    • The connection from the Leaked Photos strongly resemble the logic board of the iPad 3
    • Same cable type: Black color and “lined.”
    • Opposite side: you can see a real example of the barcode typical to Apple Products

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Problems with the Other Images as Genuine iPad Mini Photos

     

    iPad Mini Headphone Jack from Nowhereelse.fr

    Nowhereelse.fr believes this is the iPad Mini headphone jack

     

     

    iPad Mini headphone jack from iResq

    iResq 's version of the iPad Mini headphone jack

     

    Nowherelese.fr

    • Not a complete part, in that it has no port on it
    • No barcode
    • We think this looks like a mark-up part, used for testing before the final design
    • This photo they indicates that the headphone jack is going to be in close proximity to the charger port.
    • The home button flex positioning puts it at risk for tearing when disassembled.

     

    Iresq

    • Doesn’t detail Apple Barcode very well
    • A copper colored coating, rather than the typical flat black. Apple hasn’t used this color since iPhone 2G. Apple is known for its crisp black cables
    • Also show the headphone jack close to charger port
    • The home button flex appears to be positioned underneath the charger port such that it would be at high risk for tearing when disassembling the device

     

     

    One major difference between our photos and the others are that ours show the traditional setup: the headphone jack with a bit of distance before the charger port. The images from iResq and Nowhereelese.fr suggest that the jack and port will be closer together, making the iPad Mini more like a smartphone in design. Who’s right? That remains to be decided.

    As we speculated earlier, in our post about the similarities between the upcoming iPhone and the 3GS, Apple may be reviving some oldies but goodies. This seems to be the case with the iPad Mini too, in mimicking the some of the successful design elements  of the iPad 3, just in a cute little mini package.

     

     

     

    Curtis Taylor

    Curtis is a tech expert and go to guy for Fix-iPhones.com.

    Google+

  • Is Apple Returning to Classic 3GS Design with new iPhone 5?

     New iPhone 5 echoes 3GS?

    Here at www.Fix-iPhones.com The release of exclusive images of the iPhone 5 from our sister site, RepairLabs.com, this morning, has sparked a lot of debate and speculation.  It looks to us as though Apple is returning to the nostalgia of simpler times, by incorporating many of the design features of the 3GS.

    Could Apple like the old design better? Our humble theory is that they do. We suspect that under-warranty returns proved too cumbersome and clunky with the design of the iPhone 4’s.   As experts who have repaired hundreds of both the iPhone 3’s and 4’s, the design of the 3’s is much more elegant and easy to repair. It’s also far less prone to breakage, as the back housing is not made of glass. We speculate that Apple grew weary of the redesign as well.

    Of course this is not to discount all of the other changes that might have forced the return to the older design. Changing the ratio of the screen or the positioning of the camera may have contributed to the necessity of the return to the Ole Faithful design of the 3GS. To run down all of the major differences we can see, we’ve compiled this list.

    iPhone 5 exclusive images, echo 3GS

    With these photos we can confirm:

     Some Striking Similarities to the 3GS

    • Apple has reworked the whole LCD Assembly and front Digitizer of the device. There are 3 flex cables. The first seems to be the proximity ear speaker, and the front camera. The last two probably LCD and Digitizer.
    • The ratio of the device itself hints  that it is indeed the long-rumored bigger screen.
    • The camera is in the front middle of the ear speaker, no longer on the side of the ear speaker.
    • It looks like it has a black ear speaker mesh instead of the typical metallic mesh.
    • The home button is going to have more support as it backed by a metal bracket. Rather than being supported by prongs or push cables, it may actually be a combination of both.
    • It appears to have a plastic 3GS-type midframe running around the digitizer and glass LCD assembly.
    • The metal brackets suggest that it will be sitting in a housing that’s similar to that of the 3GS, but more modern and updated.
    • From the width of the bracket, we can tell the charger port is going to be smaller (as rumored) because it has to fit between the two bottom screw brackets, exactly like in the 3GS.
    • These pictures show that the LCD may pull apart from the Digitizer, given the side-situated rivets. (This is similar again to the 3GS, but a departure from the 4 and 4S.)
    • We notice a striking similarity to a 3GS, with the bottom screws and brackets. We think it will pull open from the front.

     

    So, could this be the iPhone 5 real thing? We think so, and these photos seem prove a lot of what the tech world has been suspecting all along regarding the new iPhone 5. Could Apple be going back to the old faithful model of the iPhone 3Gs? It looks probable.  We applaud the return to the previous design for ease of repair and an elegance of design.

     

    From the leader in  iPhone repair services, exclusive images of Apple hardware components,and the iPhone 5, remember you heard it here first.

     

    Stay tuned for more analysis and details!

    What do you think? Please leave your opinion in the comments.

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • 3 Must Know iPhone Tips

    In the effort to save time, energy and frustration, Fix-iPhones at RepairLabs wanted to bring  you a few friendly tips and reminders of all the nifty things your iPad and and iPhone could do. We wanted to show you just a few tips and hacks that make using these great little devices even more fun.  Everybody wants to get the most out of their iPhones, and these little tips and tricks can help.

    iPhone Tip #1

    Take a screenshot.

    iPhone Screenshot Tip from www.fix-iphones.com

    Ever have an excellent text conversation that you want to remember? Or perhaps post to Damn You Autocorrect? Get a high score?  Siri say something hysterical? Take a screen shot. It’s simple. For this tip, all you have to do is press and hold the power button and the Home button at the same time.  Make sure you’re holding both buttons at the same time. The screen flashes when it takes the picture.  Then it magically appears on your Cameral Roll in your Photos app.

     

    iPhone Tip #2

    Return to the top of the Page.

    iPhone tips 'Return to the top of Page' from www.fix-iphones.com

    Do you ever scroll way down to the bottom of a page and just not want to mess with scrolling back up? Simple tip to fix: Tap the top bar where the time and battery live appear. This little tip automatically takes you back to the top of the page.  Now you are a power user.

     

     

    iPad Tip #3

    Split Screen Typing for iPad

    iPad 2 Split Keyboard Tip from www.fix-iPhones.com

    Just HATE typing on your iPad. Really, it is impossible. But it *would* be easier to it with only thumbs, on the iPhone.  But my thumbs are damnably short!  They’ll never reach to the ‘G’ and ‘H.’  Enter split screen typing. Really these  Apple guys do think of everything.  To work this tip, just open up your keyboard, and press and hold the keyboard button. From the Arrow Down, select split screen, and utilize your already well-developed texting skills on your iPad.

     

    Hopefully these tips, tricks and hack can make your time with your iPhone just a little more fun, and help you to win friends and impress people.

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • The Heretic’s Guide to Fixing a Water Damaged iPhone.

    How to Save a Water Damaged iPhone from www.fix-iphones.com

    In our experience here at RepairLabs, there are a few things that you can do to save your water damaged iPhone. Yes, there are a  TON of people out there on the internets who claim they know the right way to save a water damaged iPhone.

    Plonk. That awful sound when you realize your phone is in the toilet.

    Facepalm. That awful moment when you know you’re going to have to fish it out. Fast.

    But now what? Now that you know your phone has water damage, what do you do? You get on the Internet and figure out how to save it. You read five or ten articles and they tell you the same things over and over. Put it in rice. Remove the SIM card. Take out the battery. Big help.  Only an expert with a specialized jewelry flathead screwdriver can get the battery out of an iPhone. And the rice trick is dubious at best. We know that everybody on the internet swears by it. This is the guide that will tell you what really works and what doesn’t. It’ll probably say some unpopular things, going against common Net wisdom, so we’ll get all the Heresy out of the way right at the beginning.

     

    The Myths of How to Save a Water Damaged iPhone.

    So, should you really put it in a bag of rice, or is that just a myth? It sure makes ya feel better. Almost like you have some control over the situation. Yes, rice is a desiccant, just like those silica gel packs you find in beef jerky bags. They keep things from getting…chewy.  If you want to leave it in rice while you wait your 48 hours, be our guest. It can’t really hurt anything. To try the rice trick, simply seal your phone in a Ziploc full of rice, making sure to get all the extra air out of it. Leave your water damaged iPhone off for at least 48 hours in the rice. But we’ve fixed hundreds of wet, water damaged iPhones here, and you wouldn’t believe how many of those actually arrive here in that bag of rice. It just doesn’t help.  It doesn’t do anything but waste rice.

    Other people recommend silica gel packs or desiccant, but we rarely have those on hand, and time is of the essence in taking out the moisture. Rust and corrosion can begin to develop in one day.

    • DON’T: Shake your iPhone to get out any extra water that was in it.  It seems like a really great idea, but it’s not. You want to prevent the water from moving across any circuitry. This is when you can actually do extra damage causing shorts and corrosion that you wouldn’t have otherwise.
    • DON’T: Worry about taking out the SIM card. You can’t remove the iPhone’s battery, and we don’t recommend trying, given all the delicate innards of the device.
    • DON’T: try sucking out the extra moisture with a vacuum cleaner hose and nozzle. This is just is another opportunity for water to move across more circuitry.
    • DON’T put it in the oven. This can melt tiny pieces of logic board. We’ve actually fixed a phone that someone put in the oven to dry out.  Never put a water damaged iPhone in the microwave. This will destroy both the phone and the microwave, and then burn your entire house down.

     

    So what SHOULD you do?

    Water Damaged iPhone Triage. What to do:

    Okay, so your phone has gone swimming.

    Your warranty is now void. Don’t worry about voiding it. iPhone warranties don’t cover water damage, and remember, you can’t trick the guys at Apple. They have liquid sensors all over those little phones. Check out what they look like here.  You’ll see white strips, some with red stripes, inside your phone (in the headphone jack, for instance) that will turn pink or bleed if the phone’s been exposed to water damage.  We’ve repaired hundreds of cell phones and these are the things that we know from experience  that work:

    • Get that phone out of the water ASAP.
    • THIS IS THE MOST IMPORTANT PART: Power it off immediately. If it hasn’t already powered off, turn it off.  If it won’t stop “Pinwheeling” or you can’t “slide to power off,” do a hard shutdown (press the home button and the screen button and hold for 10 seconds until the device powers off). This is critical; it’s your best chance to save your device.
    • Remove all peripherals and covers attached to the phone.
    • If it’s been totally submerged in salt water or chlorinated water, go ahead and rinse it in tap water. This will prevent the chlorinated and salt water from crystalizing in your device, again causing shorts. If your iPhone was just splashed or sprinkled, it doesn’t count. Only do this if your device was submerged and soaked.
    • Gently blow dry with a hairdryer on the lowest setting. Many articles say to never do this. They believe you are stupid and will melt your own logic boards. We think you’re smart enough to work a hair dryer.  Keep the dryer moving at all times and don’t let the phone get hot.  15 minutes should be plenty.  The idea is to evaporate the moisture without moving it across any more circuitry, exposing it to more possible short outs. The important part is to get a warm steady stream of dry air, so in theory you could even leave it in front of the heater vent overnight with the same effect.
    • Leave it alone for at least 48 hours before you even THINK of turning it back on.  If it’s going to come back to life, this is your chance. 48 hours at a miniumum, 72 is better. Utilize this time to unplug, and reconnect with your family. (Hear 1950s informational film voice.)  If the device was in the water for more than a minute, at least 6-7 days.
    • If you are stout of heart, and can stand submerging the device again you can try an alcohol bath, as FiscalGeek explains in this great article. Alcohol won’t harm your phone (any more than it’s already been harmed by the water damage), and will dry out any extra moisture in it.  You’ll need denatured alcohol. (Available at Walmart and hardware stores, usually around the paint sections.)A 95% alcohol solution is best (rubbing alcohol is around 75%), and not suitable for human consumption. Please do not submerge your phone in Cake Vodka. Or any vodka.

     

    1. Get a container slightly larger than the phone, and fill with alcohol.
    2. Remove any plugs or covers on the phone, so that the liquid can get it.
    3. Submerge your phone in the liquid. You may need to weight it down.
    4. Gently jiggle the container around to make certain the alcohol can flush out all of the water.
    5. Soak it for at least 5 minutes.  You can repeat this step if you aren’t successful the first time.
    6. Take your iphone out of the liquid and let it dry.  The alcohol evaporates very quickly but you want to be certain no water remains that can cause short-outs.

     

    The overarching theme of all the research I’ve done on this leads to one point. You don’t turn that phone back on. No matter how worried you are or how upset or how much you just really really neeeed to see if you got any text messages. This is the time that short circuits can occur.  You must give it time for all that water to dry out and prevent further damage.

    If after 72 hours or an alcohol bath it won’t power back on, it’s time to send it in to us. Sometimes, even if it does come back to life, it’s sustained some corrosion damage from the moisture. (What we’re aiming to prevent with the alcohol bath.)  It may power on but behave erratically with different functionalities of the phone working and not. Water damage does some weird stuff to an iPhone, like making it vibrate at the wrong times, or making the WiFi not work.

    The good news is that it’s fixable. Even if Apple won’t, we fix ‘em all the time, and it’s almost always cheaper to fix a water damaged iPhone than to replace it.  (We can do it for as little as forty bucks.) You can see some of our water damage fix options here.

     

    Sources:

    http://techpp.com/2009/12/13/how-to-save-and-repair-your-mobile-phone-after-water-damage/

    http://www.fiscalgeek.com/2009/06/ff_water_damaged_cellphone/

    http://www.wikihow.com/Save-a-Wet-Cell-Phone

    http://www.blogonerd.me/2011/09/what-to-do-if-your-iphone-gets-water.html

    http://support.apple.com/kb/ht3302

    Under: Water Damaged iPhone.

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • Apple Certified Techs: Breaking down AK-47s in Under 4 Minutes.

    What does Apple Certification really mean?

    I recently sat down for an interview with Jason Draper, our in-house Fix-iPhones RepairLabs ACMT (Apple Certified Mac Technician) to learn a little bit more about his training and what being ‘Apple Certified’ really means.

    Jason Draper, Apple Certified Macintosh Technician

    We got him off of caffeine long enough to snap a 'polariod'

    So, is being Mac certified really that big of a deal?

    Well, before the interview, Jason slipped me his password for his AppleCare Service Training Course, so I nosed through some of the requirements and course prep myself.  I found out that each AppleCare certified tech mush have a thorough, tested knowledge in: Diagnostic, Hardware Tools, Troubleshooting  Theory (with an Apple-defined problem solving strategy that the technicians are expected to use), and Recognizing Accidental Damage.

    The test also requires extensive knowledge in: Embedded Battery Handling (proper handling in all manner of MacBooks), Electric Static Discharge Precautions, Power Management, LCD Service Issues and Repairs, and Hardware Service Issues.  Hardware repairs include best practices for  Electric Static Discharge procedures  (ESD) – to strap and ground yourself to remove static electricity, as even tiny shocks “from rubbing your feet on the carpet can destroy a logic board, or put a hole in resistor or chips with one little poke,” says Jason.

    The Wireless Networking capabilities the Mac Cert Techs are required to have include: setup, troubleshooting and repairs for AirPort Express, AirPort Extreme, and Time Capsule as well as Bluetooth products. He also has to be able to efficiently troubleshoot and service the iMac, MacBook, ‘Air, and ‘Pro.Jason explained that he must have a full working knowledge of repairing devices under warranty, and of what accidental damage may or may not be covered AppleCare. The course also makes certain that each tech has a clear knowledge of Reference sources, so he will know where to find the answers if he doesn’t know them off the top of his head.

    If that’s not enough, the Course Objectives commonly include: Terminology, Underlying Technology, and phrases like “Trained to isolate the issue in 3 minutes or less.” My favorite among these objectives, verbatim, is:

    “Given a set of instructions and an external drive, configure a known-good diagnostic drive with install and startup volumes in 25 minutes.”

    Next: Break down an AK-47 in under 4 minutes. Really, these guys have to be the Marine Corps of geek.  Each of the 30-some sections contains around 10 course objectives just like the (serious) ones above, and the tech in testing must be able to demonstrate any of these skills when called upon.

    Jason explains that Apple certified techs can repair any iOS devices: iPad, iPhone, and portable and desktop Macs. They are trained to deal with dropped devices, cracked screens, glass, and housings.  He had to learn Hardware and Software--especially the New iOS system, Lion. “It’s going to be very user friendly, I like it,” he commented.

    One fascinating element of the training shows just how tough the Macs are and how good the new iOS is, insofar as the hardware so rarely breaks. The course explicitly states the reason it requires certification in not only the hardware, but especially the software:

    Technicians might believe that understanding the Mac operating system is secondary when it comes to repairing hardware. This isn’t true. Over 75% of system malfunctions can be traced directly to misused, incorrectly set, or corrupted software.

    “There’s so much more on a Mac that’s software related,” says Jason, “Their hardware rarely fails. It’s a different world with a PC.”

    He explained that the test covers customer based support issues, such as simple problems with software, and how techs had to be able to talk the customers through how to fix them. Common problems include iTunes issues, update issues, and the iPhone not syncing correctly with a computer.

    Not only that, he has to be able to help customers EMOTIONALLY cope with a damaged machine.” (C’mon, we’ve all felt the soul-crushing anguish of a broken device.) Apple doesn’t neglect training its techs to work with customer complaints and objections, reminding the techs that “Denial is very human.”

    So not only does he have to be the repair guy, as well as the tech-support guy, he has to be the grief counselor and shrink to overwrought customers.

    “I also like long walks on the beach with my Mac. And my wife. Who is beautiful.  Sorry, Honey.” Jason adds, as he enumerates his talents. Apple also emphasizes ongoing education, and techs are required to recertify every year. Since becoming Apple Certified, the next step Jason would like to take is to become an Apple consultant. 

     

     

    Additional Sources

    http://www.technibble.com/how-to-become-an-apple-certified-technician/


    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • Who Knew Siri Could be So Sexy? iOS 6 Infographic

    The RepairLabs at fix-iphones.com are pretty stoked about all of the fancy new changes to Siri in the latest iteration of the Apple operating system, iOS 6.  We let our Social Media Girl come up with an infographic with a brief rundown of all of the nifty new additions. This is what she came up with. She thinks Siri is sexy too.

    Siri iOS 6 Infographic of new features

    She does it all, boys.

    Between the restaurant reviews and the movie reviews- and the nav!- just let her plan your date nights.

     

     

     

    Sources

    http://www.infowars.com/siri%E2%80%99s-dirty-little-secret/

    http://mashable.com/2012/06/11/ios-6-revaled/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+Mashable%2FS

    ocialMedia+%28Mashable+%C2%BB+Social+Media+Feed%29#68581Ivy-Bridge

    http://www.cultofmac.com/172994/hands-on-demo-of-siris-new-features-in-ios-6-video/

    http://mashable.com/2012/06/15/wozniak-on-siri/

    http://www.siri-isms.com/computer-world-431/

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • iPhone 5, 4-inch Display: Pros and Cons

    www.fix-iphones.com

    iPhone 5Left: Possible Version of iPhone 5 with only the screen sized increased. Center: Current iPhone 4S. Right: Possible Version of iPhone 5 with entire size increased. The difference is about as much as a stack of 10 pennies.

    The rumors of the much anticipated 4-inch screen on the Apple iPhone 5 abound this week on the web. Since Reuters reaffirmed them yesterday, citing an anonymous source, it has become internet gospel and the source of countless artists’ mockups (some of the niftiest here on The Verge).

     So how different is the reported new screen size? Apple’s Old Faithful screen size, 3.5 inches, is growing to a whopping 4-inch (on the diagonal) screen. And how can we visualize the increase? Some analogs for the actual size of that half-inch include.

    •  A half-inch ear gaug
    • The hem on your pants (usually)
    • A stack of about 10 pennies
    • One half of an inch worm

    For the ladies, the ½ inch barrel of a curling iron, for when you want those sassy spirals.
    Really? Half of an inchworm is going to make a revolutionary difference in the way we interface with the world? Around the repair shop, we are not impressed. Really, how much difference can 10 pennies worth of screen size actually make? Apple doesn’t need to compete with Samsung’s Note, or the Android. Come on people, they’re Apple. They defined the smartphone. Heck, they invented it. Literally invented it.  So in that spirit, let’s think of reasons to abandon this cockamamie scheme that Apple has apparently entered into.

    Cons

    • You’ll have to move your thumb to navigate the whole screen. We’ll lose the ability to swipe in a single motion.
    • iPhones have always had a 3.5 inch screen. Always.
    • A bigger phone? Less Pocket space? Who wants to hold a brick up to their ear? (It all depends on whether Apple will increase the size of the entire phone, or just the screen, as illustrated in our mockups above.)
    • Crowding the other features: ear speaker, mic, camera, and Home button, especially if the rest of the phone stays the same size.
    • The rumored smaller pill-shaped doc connector (what about all of my accessories??? Am I gonna hafta buy more adapters??)
    • Rumored to be slimmer, or rounded, so you have to buy a new case. Again.
    • A bigger screen could also require longer loading time.  Not great when you’re trying to load a map.

    But not so fast. In the interests of ‘journalistic integrity’ and fair and balanced blogging, maybe I should adopt the position of Devil’s Advocate and consider some of the benefits this increase in screen size.  Consumers have begun to use their smartphones like we used to use laptops, for anything from watching videos to playing games, to reading the news to, DJing parties. Those little devices live in our pockets and backpacks and handbags. They go to the park and museum with us. We don’t like to be without them. Maybe it wouldn’t hurt if the screen was just a little bit bigger…

    Samsung has, after all, managed to sell some 20 million Galaxy II devices, which boast a 4.8-inch display. And the fact that not all of my Con points are precisely related to the ‘screen size’ gives me pause.  Maybe this isn’t the absolute worst idea I’ve ever heard…There are a few good points to a larger screen size, providing I won’t experience even the tiniest inconvenience  way from the change.

    Pros

    • More room for Angry Birds.
    • Good for guys, with large, clumsy fingers or “Sausage Hand Syndrome.”
    • Bigger view when running the apps.
    • Better gaming.
    • Reduced eye strain. Seriously, I’ve found myself holding my phone closer and closer to my face to read it.
    • Larger screens happen to be the hot trend right now.
    • Better widescreen videos.
    • More Message History at a glance.
    • Bigger Maps.
    • Fitting 4(!) more App Buttons on the Home Screen. Yesssssss. I can already feel my productivity skyrocketing.
    • Screenshots (See the link to the Verge above.) Look at how much Internet you can fit onto that baby! Check out the ‘Safari.app’ photo.
    • Now that I look at my 4S, it doesn’t reallllly seem to use all of that room around the screen, well, *ahem, efficiently.  There’s kind of a lot of space by the home button and ear speaker. In fact, next to the Galaxy II, it seems downright clunky and tiny.

    Size Matters

    Shame on you, Apple, for making me feel clunky and tiny at the same time! How dare you? It makes me wonder why we simply didn’t have 4-inch screens to begin with. I guess that I will admit that I’ve been converted. In fact, I demand a 4-inch screen immediately. With production expected to start in August, and the device anticipated to be released (in high Apple Release-Date Tradition) in the fall, looks like I’m going to have to wait a few more months.

    Looking at it this way, I’m willing to concede that maybe the change will do some good. As @HAL9000_ on Twitter points out:

    “The iPhone 5 will have a 4 inch screen; Apple is finally admitting 3.5inches isn't enough, even if you do know how to use it.”

    What do you think? Do the pros outweigh the cons? Does size really matter?

    Additional Sources

    http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/17/reuters-agrees-the-next-iphone-will-be-larger/

    http://techcrunch.com/2012/05/16/its-time-for-a-larger-iphone/

    http://www.techradar.com/news/phone-and-communications/mobile-phones/iphone-5-release-date-news-and-rumours-721534

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • EXCLUSIVE Images of iPad 3 Digitizer

    Front Glass of the iPad 3

    RepairLabshas already brought you exclusive images of the iPad 3 back housing. Now, just days before the official launch, this iPhone repair service can show you more pictures of Apple's latest release.

    The picture above is the iPad 3 digitizer. This part controls the iPad's touch function, as well as includes your front glass. As you can see from our images, not much has changed in the look of your iPad. With the back housing in hand, and now with this piece, we can confirm your iPad will look a lot like the iPad 2, just that 1mm thicker. The picture above also proves that we will have the home button on the iPad 3, contrary to some reportsthat came out yesterday. We also can see that Apple is planning to have both black and white models of the iPad 3, which is not surprising.

    Another change we have noticed is the digitizer connection. That difference between the iPad 3 and the digitizer part for the iPad 2 does confirm that the logic board will be different, just as we surmised by looking at the back housing.

    Although there are quite a few internal changes coming for the iPad 3, including that much-anticipated LCD screen, the digitizer proves that Apple has not made any radical form changes to your favorite device.

    Inside of the iPad 3 Digitizer

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

  • iPad 3 Update

    Almost three weeks ago, your favorite iPhone repair company brought you the first images of the iPad 3 back housing. To say we got everyone talking might be somewhat of an understatement. Right after our pictures went viral, a slew of other leaks brought us a lot of information on the iPad 3 and what we can expect. With Apple's announcement only a week away, we still have some time to speculate on what we will hear about the tablet's update.

    Before we were able to show you an unfortunately low-res picture of the iPad 3 back case. Now we have our own iPad 3 back housing, and our techs have spent some time examining it. Below are some of the changes we can confirm with our previous intel and other sources.

    1. The LCD mount is different, and that coincides with the rumors and evidence we have had pointing to a higher resolution display that will be different from what we had on the iPad 2.
    2. Now that we have had it in our hands, we can confirm the battery area of the iPad 3 is 5/8 inch larger than the iPad 2. More battery to allow for that high-resolution screen and to keep your iPad from the charger for the same amount of time we have grown accustomed to.
    3. The charger port dock is different. After comparing the two iPads, our techs believe that the iPad 3 charging port has been beefed up to provide more stable support. We have had several customers with bent USB ports on iPad 1 and 2, and this added support should keep that from happening as often for iPad 3 users.
    4. The housing on the iPad 3 is a measly 1mm thicker roughly, but it's such a minor change you probably wouldn't notice the difference.

    Not a great deal of information, but enough to see where rumors are going right, and a lot to support them. Now we just have to wait that week until we are able to find out if all of the rumors were true.

    by , Tech Expert, Freelance Writer.

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